Smilodon bringing down MegatheriumSabre-toothed cats had weak bites – a new comparison of Smilodon‘s skull with a modern lion’s shows that the cat probably didn’t run up and bite its prey with those teeth. Probably it brought prey down with a full-body tackle (it had extra strong claws) and then used the famous teeth to make the kill once it had the animal pinned. At least, that’s the latest theory.

Velociraptor’s ‘killing’ claws were for climbing – I’m just ruining all the prehistoric artists’ conceptions today, aren’t I? Analyses of velociraptor claws shows they weren’t sharp enough to disembowel prey, but were strong enough to hold the dinosaur’s weight as it climbed trees.

Kids, even babies, judge others based on skin color – and we exacerbate the problem by keeping the subject taboo. The author writes of his own son: “Katz’s work helped me to realize that Luke was never actually colorblind. He didn’t talk about race in his first five years because our silence had unwittingly communicated that race was something he could not ask about. … we started to overhear one of his white friends talking about the color of their skin. They still didn’t know what to call their skin, so they used the phrase ‘skin like ours.’ And this notion of ours versus theirs started to take on a meaning of its own.”

Swine flu vaccine: Too little, too late (SciAm article, first half available online) – When you’re trying to make enough flu vaccine, boosting production with new methods and adjuvants is at odds with safety and testing (and the potential for lawsuits). The author seems to think litigation is the problem; but if people are suing because they’ve been harmed by the vaccine, wouldn’t it be more correct to say safety is the problem? Deciding how much risk is appropriate is a tough question.

Jell-O shots in adolescence lead to gambling later in life – When you want to study alcohol and risky behavior in rats, do it right! Yes, they really fed the rats jell-o shots, and taught them to gamble.

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